Tagged: Assessing Risks

Rising To Leadership

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There are standards to which government, religion and higher education should be held. There are examples that politicians and principled businesspeople should endeavor to set, regardless of whether their peers are making that effort. There’s right and wrong, not just better or worse.

And there’s a word for recognizing and rising to that: leadership. We could use more of it. ~ NY Times, Weary of Relativity, May 23, 2015.

There are times when I convince myself that I’m doing alright by telling myself that:

  • I do better than that other person.
  • I’m not as bad as so-and-so.
  • This is how everyone else does it, it’s good enough.
  • Things are fine, why should I go that extra mile?
  • There’s not enough time to do it the way it should be done.

Lowering the bar is tempting, especially when I’m tired. I don’t want to go there though. I want to strive to always do my best. I won’t always succeed but I want to keep that bar raised high.

I want to do right, not just better than others.

Are high standards important to you?

The purpose of this blog is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.

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If I Have To Choose…

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I’d rather have a life of “OH WELLS” than a life of “WHAT IFS.”

Because it’s easier for me to take my lumps in ‘oh wells’ than it is to take them in ‘what ifs.’ I’d rather try and fail than not try and forever wonder.

I am reminded of a post I’d read months ago (link below) about the regrets people have on their deathbed…

…and my thoughts about the areas I needed to work on; areas I have been consciously and unconsciously working on since reading the article.

According to Bronnie Ware the Top 5 regrets people have on their deathbed are:

1. I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself.
2. I wish I didn’t work so hard.
3. I wish I’d had the courage to express my feelings.
4. I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.
5. I wish that I had let myself be happier.

To read more on Bronnie’s thoughts see Nurse reveals the top 5 regrets people make on their deathbed

Which of the above points resonate with you? What are you doing about it?

The purpose of this blog is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.

Caring For Future Generations

I wonder what would happen if...

I wonder what would happen if…

Each generation, at some point, bemoans the world they have inherited from the previous generation. With their whole lives ahead of them, they vow to leave a better world for the next generation.

 Then life happens.

The drive to provide for, and protect, their immediate tribe becomes priority. They block out the injustices in the rest of the world, not entirely, but where these issues intersect their own survival – they choose to protect themselves.

This is not necessarily a bad thing.

This is how we have survived for tens of thousands of years. We’re not really wired to think about 10, 50 or 100 years from now.

But perhaps in our old age, with our lives mostly behind us, we are freed up to think about future generations.
Maybe then we are willing to plant the tree whose shade we will never personally enjoy.

I wonder what we could learn and what plans we would conceive if we listened to the idealistic dreams of the young and tempered them with the life-time wisdom of the aged.

“A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.” – Greek proverb

What can you do today to facilitate discussions about the state of the world for future generations? Who would you invite to participate?

The purpose of this blog is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.

Bad Luck…Or Is It?

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You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from. – Cormac McCarthy

Can you look back on a particular situation where you are sure divine intervention saved you a world of trouble?

Because even when we plan for the future to ensure that we will be prepared for whatever may come, bad or unforeseen things can happen to foil our carefully laid plans.

Sometimes what seems like a bad thing at the time, ends up being the best thing that ever happened to us.

Many years ago, I missed catching a ride with someone because I answered the phone and ended up chatting longer than I had intended.

Irritated with the situation and mumbling under my breath, I hailed a cab. Upon arriving at my destination, I learned that my would-have-been driver had been in an accident.

I’ve experienced a handful of similar situations with varying degrees of seriousness. Enough to make me more patient when things don’t always go my way.

A missed flight…

an unsuccessful job application…

a strategy that doesn’t work out as planned…

…might just be the best thing that ever happened.

Has something seemingly bad ever worked out for the best for you?

The purpose of this blog is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.

Just Cut That Wood Already

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Nothing will ever be attempted if all possible objections must first be overcome.” – Samuel Johnson

We’ve all heard that saying, “Measure twice, cut once.” It’s good advice meant to make sure you get what you envisioned.

When used as it is meant to be understood, it is good. When used as an excuse not to proceed, it is self-defeating.

In the context of an organization, it is good and advisable to have policies.

Policies equip and empower an organization to fulfill its mission.

The problem comes when policies are used to hide behind; preventing us from actually doing the work that we’re mandated to do.

Yes, do measure twice, but then cut already!

I mean, why start something if you’re not willing to take some risks?

The purpose of this blog is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.

Don’t get Caught with Your Pants Down

unpreparedHAVE YOU EVER had that nightmare where you show up to work with no pants on? Well it can happen, figuratively speaking, in a very real way if you don’t ask yourself some very important questions.

It’s not so much that you need to be prepared for a what if it happens scenario as it is you need to be prepared for a when it happens scenario.

One day something will go sideways. And when it does, wouldn’t it be nice to know that you can refer to your well thought-out plan?

True – you can’t be prepared for every possible situation. But with a little forethought you can be prepared for most situations and at the very least be equipped with good processes and templates that you can adapt for unforeseen events.

Some questions you may want to ask yourself are:

  • What would we do if a major funding source suddenly became unavailable?
  • What are the risks associated with the delivery of programs and services?
  • If something happened to a key employee, would we still be able to operate?
  • Are all our core business practices procedurally documented?
  • What type of scandal would close our doors forever?
  • If any of these situations should occur, how would we communicate it?
  • Who would we communicate it to?
  • When would we communicate it?

If you haven’t invested in a good Tighten-Your-Belt-a-Notch-to-Keep-Your-Pants-Up plan your only recourse may very well be to hope that it doesn’t get too messy and that you wore clean underwear that day!

You don’t won’t to get caught with your pants down, do you? How are you going to make sure that doesn’t happen?

The purpose of The Other Bottom Line is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.