Tagged: saying thank you

Celebrate Joy and Grow Through Sorrow

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When life is sweet, say thank you and celebrate, when life is bitter, say thank you and grow. ~ unknown

What an amazing journey we’re on!
Life is a gift.
Its ebbs and flows.
Its highs and lows.
The connections we make and break.
The joys and sorrows we experience.
Each one of our paths; unique
a combination of choice and circumstance.

Sometimes courageously following our dreams. Inspiring and encouraging others to follow theirs. Take hold of ‘moments of joy’ – treasure them in your heart. They will carry you through the hard times.

Other times we are paralyzed by fear. These times make us empathetic and patient with others who are afraid.

Embrace every part of who you are.
Rippling effects that change the course of our path, that teach us if we let them. Or haunt us until we are teachable.
Life is a gift.
A beautiful and precious gift.
Don’t squander it.
Don’t take it for granted.
Be grateful for every opportunity given.
Even our mistakes have meaning when viewing our lives in this way.

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Two Simple, Yet Powerful Words…

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Gratitude makes sense of our past, brings peace for today, and creates a vision for tomorrow ~Melody Beattie

A FEW YEARS BACK I got to do one of my favourite things.

I sat down at my desk with a list of ten names.

Each had made a recent donation to the non-profit organization I worked for.

These ten people contributed to the bottom line.

But there’s a deeper story.

About a week or two before this list hit my desk;

Ten people in the privacy of their homes thought about my organization.

They thought about the work that is done;

how it makes the world a better place;

they thought about their loved ones who receive quality care from our passionate and dedicated staff;

and then each one, in his/her own home, sat down and wrote a cheque.

That just blows my mind. It fills me with deep gratitude.

Armed with my list I had the privilege of calling each one to tell them that:

  • they made my day
  • we couldn’t do it without them
  • and thank you.

Turns out I made their day too.

Two simple, yet powerful words.

When’s the last time you said thank you?

The purpose of this blog is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.

Do You Know How To Appreciate Your Donor?

 

Appreciation is a wonderful thing: It makes what is excellent in others belong to us as well. ~ Voltaire

imagesUX8A5PA5MOST ORGANIZATIONS KNOW IT’S IMPORTANT TO RECOGNIZE DONORS, but what happens when how you do it has the opposite affect?

I recently celebrated my birthday and was blown away by all the good wishes that came my way in person, by phone and by email.

Because it feels good to be appreciated

Even people whom I hadn’t had recent contact with, reached out to me through Facebook and Twitter; many letting me know the difference I have made in their lives, personally and professionally and wishing me a year of the same sort of kindness.

I was moved by their words and the creative ways they chose to express their gratitude and birthday wishes. And some of the most touching messages included videos, personal photographs and poetically woven words.

I LOVED IT!

But there are people who are not comfortable with public acknowledgement.

I suppose a more private person wouldn’t share their birth date on Facebook or click the feature that allows people to post on their wall.

How do you appreciate your donors?

How do you know what your donor’s preferences are?  Not every person is comfortable with public acknowledgement; preferring something more personal or even wanting to be completely anonymous. Do you know your donors well enough to know what makes them feel appreciated?

What’s the point of showing gratitude if your donor does not feel appreciated, or even worse, is offended and feels their privacy has been compromised?

The purpose of this blog is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.

Spending Your Energy Wisely, Compassionately and Encouragingly

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There’s a lot of work to do in fundraising, especially at this time of year!

So you will want to spend your energy wisely.

Not just wisely though; compassionately and encouragingly as well.

  • DO ask your faithful donors for yearend gifts
  • DO make it easy for donors to give in a way that is convenient for them.
  • DON’T make your donors jump through hoops because it makes your job easier
  • DO thank all your donors in a timely manner
  • DO let your donors know how they are changing the world through their giving
  • DO honour your donors’ mailing preferences
  • DON’T try to convince those who are not interested in your cause to support you. DO encourage them to pursue and give to the causes they are passionate about.
  • DON’T ask again, if you haven’t said thank you
  • DON’T bully or use guilt to keep a donor who has indicated they can no longer support you. DO thank them for all they’ve done in the past and wish them well.

In a nutshell, treat donors as you would loved ones. Remember that not everyone likes your cause and that there are many worthy causes out there for donors to support. There’s enough to go around.

I would love to hear your tips for healthy donor relationships. Please leave them in the comment section below.

The purpose of this blog is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.

Saying Thank You and Why You Need To Do It

I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought, and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder. ~ G.K. Chesterton

untitledIn a previous post, I wrote about Asking For Money and Why You Need To Do It. Equally important, is saying thank you.

As a fundraiser, you work hard to resource your organization’s programs by soliciting donations, volunteers and community support. You know that if you don’t ask, it’s not going to happen.

And if feels good to connect a donor or volunteer with a person in need, doesn’t it? It makes you feel good. It makes the donor/volunteer feel good. It makes the person in need feel good.

Equally important is saying thank you. It validates the generosity of the giver and endears her to you and your organization’s mission.

YOUR THANK YOU LIST

Thank your team

If you have a development team, remember to thank them for their hard work. Your job is made so much easier through the efforts of the people who process your donations, coordinate your volunteers, plan your events and engage the community through communications and the development of promotional collateral.

Thank your donors

This is a no-brainer. Send timely thank you letters and receipts. Send handwritten notes. Surprise them with thank you calls. Tell their stories in your newsletters and on your social media platforms.

Thank your volunteers

Thank those who work on your capital campaigns and other fundraising efforts. Thank those who give their time in programs that serve your clients. Thank your board. Thank those who provide professional services for free.

Thank your co-workers

Thank those outside of your department; those on the frontlines who are often the first face the public sees. Your peers in other departments who support your efforts. Your CEO who meets with donors and attends the events you ask him to go to.

Thank your community

When you host a gala, create a sponsorship event, or put out an urgent need request to the public; consider placing a thank you ad in the paper, on the radio or on TV. Tell the story on Facebook, blogs and other social networks.

Asking for help to resource your organization’s programs is critical to fulfilling your mission. Equally important, is saying thank you.

The purpose of this blog is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.

In Sacred Remembrance of the Canadians Who Gave Their Lives for Our Freedom

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by John McCrae, May 1915

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

Thank you to those Canadian men and women who gave their lives for our freedom and to the non-profit organizations who care for our veterans.

7 Time-Tested Tips For Building Stronger Donor Relationships

imagesGMI3ULB2Be Genuine. Speak from your heart. Be true to who you are. Don’t say what you think they want to hear just to get a donation.

Take responsibility for your mistakes. Fess up before you’re found out. Apologize when you are wrong. Listen graciously to their concerns.

Keep your promises. Do what you said you would do. If you are unable to keep your promise, call them and explain why.

Be respectful. Respect their opinions. Respect their wishes in regards to receiving mail from you. Respect their privacy. Respect their decision on how they would like to designate their donation.

Show your appreciation. Say thank you. Tell them how grateful you are for them. Tell them the story of how their contributions make a difference. Tell them how inspiring they are.

Listen. Learn why they give to you. Discover what motivates them. Hear their dreams for a better world. Listen to their ideas and feedback. Invite conversation. Stay in regular contact with them.

Recognition. Brag about them every chance you get. Share the story of their generosity and compassion. Tell others how much you value their ideas and involvement and how they are changing the world.

It’s not Rocket Science. Think about how you would like to be treated and apply it to your donors.

The purpose of this blog is to facilitate discussions that will help us all to better engage with our communities. Your participation and feedback are most welcomed and valued. Please join the discussion below.